5 Reasons why Video Gets More Attention than Still Images

5 Reasons why Video Gets More Attention than Still Images

We live in a world that’s constantly on the go. Because of this, it’s imperative that you find unique, new ways to make your services and products stand out from the huge crowd of marketers trying to get your prospects’ attention.

Video marketing is not a new concept. But it has proven to be vastly superior to other ways of marketing, including still images. This holds true now more than ever.

Here, we’ll take a look at how video marketing gets more attention than still images in your marketing campaigns. Let’s take a look.

Why It Works

Almost everybody has a ridiculously hectic daily schedule. Because of this, consumers prefer watching a three-minute video over reading 15 minutes of information that a still image drew them into.

Presenters at a recent INBOUND marketing and sales conference came to the conclusion that around half of all content produced by marketers should be video.

However, according to the recent B2B content marketing study done by Content Marketing Institute, only around60% of B2B marketers have used any kind of video marketing. Worse yet, only 10% have used live streaming marketing tactics.

If you haven’t started video marketing yet, now’s the time. Do you still need more convincing? Here are five concrete reasons why video gets more attention than still images.

  1. Boost Conversion Rates

Look at your video production as an investment. HubSpot reports that when you include a video rather than a still image on your website’s landing page, you’ll increase conversionsby around 80%.

When a visitor is presented with a compelling video presenter, it influences buying decisions and converts prospects into leads. When you’re able to convey the right emotions in a video presentation, it’s an irreplaceable selling tool.

Videos can also be used for testimonials and tutorials, depending on what your goal is.

  1. Video in Email Marketing

If you’re like most of us, your email account is bombarded. It’s hard as a marketer to get someone to open their emails.

Just mentioning the word “video” in the subject line of your marketing email increases open rates and cuts down on unsubs.

Further, video marketing in email campaigns directly leads to a 200 – 300% click-through rate increase. Videos in email work best if your goal is a product demo, or you’re looking to express something you can’t get across with images and words.

  1. Automatic SEO

Search engines like Google promote content that is engaging to viewers. There is nothing that drives more clicks and longer page views than video.

Beyond that, YouTube is the world’s second largest search engine. It only trails Google. When you put your video on YouTube, you instantly gain more visibility and opportunity to show up on a customer’s device.

Of course, don’t forget to promote all of your videos on social media as well.

  1. Build Credibility and Trust

Are you looking to create a personality for your brand? Video is by far the best way to do it. You’ll be able to quickly connect with viewers and earn trust.

When making a buying decision, 90% of users report that videos were a large part of their decision-making process. Videos build trust and trust translates to sales.

  1. Automatically Encourage Social Sharing

There’s no two ways about it; we live in the age of viral videos. A full 92% of consumers who watch videos on their mobile devices share those videos with other people. Video marketing is your chance to have fun and show the world what your company is all about.

Video Marketing vs. Still Images

As we forge into 2020 and beyond, video marketing is going to keep growing in size and scope. What you do with your video marketing campaign is only limited by your own imagination.

Video marketing isn’t just for the big brands anymore. If you own or operate a business, it’s time to get on board with the trend and start video marketing.

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All opinions expressed on USDR are those of the author and not necessarily those of US Daily Review.