Diabetes Research Group Remembers Alan Thicke

By USDR.

JDRF is deeply saddened by the passing of type 1 diabetes (T1D) champion Alan Thicke. Most widely known for his acting career, including his role as Dr. Jason Seaver on the hit 1980s show, Growing Pains, Thicke was also a devoted advocate for T1D research since his eldest son, Brennan Thicke, was diagnosed 37 years ago.

Thicke and his ex-wife Gloria Loring have supported JDRF as donors, fundraisers, volunteers and passionate spokespeople. Thicke was instrumental in helping JDRF establish chapters in Ottowa and Calgary in his home country of Canada and also helped the Los Angeles Chapter to grow and thrive. Thicke was active in a number of diabetes charities, including one of his own, the Alan Thicke Centre.

His son, Brennan, was diagnosed with T1D at age 4 after a revelation at a family reunion. Alan’s stepmother, a nurse, noticed that Brennan was exhibiting the symptoms of type 1 diabetes – including extreme thirst and excessive trips to the bathroom. In a recent interview, Thicke described how the first months after Brennan’s diagnosis were especially stressful and scary: “After hours of cajoling and chasing him around the house I had to pin him to the floor to give him his [insulin] shot. He was kicking and screaming.” When Thicke was reduced to tears, young Brennan came to a realization. “He recognized he wasn’t being punished by getting a shot, and that the shots were hurting me almost as much as they were hurting him… That changed our whole relationship. He realized we were a team.”

The Thickes’ difficulties managing T1D are all too familiar to millions of families worldwide. In recent years, research has led to improvements in treatment, including pumps and continuous glucose monitors that have offered people with T1D a better quality of life, but Thicke never lost sight of his crusade for a cure.

On behalf of everyone at JDRF and the entire T1D community, we extend our heartfelt condolences to Thicke’s family, friends and colleagues, and we thank Thicke for his endless support of type 1 diabetes awareness and research. Because of his efforts and those of his family beginning decades ago, countless people are leading safer, happier lives today.

About Type 1  Diabetes
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, a hormone people need to get energy from food. T1D strikes both children and adults and has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle. There is currently nothing you can do to prevent it. People with T1D must regularly monitor their blood sugar level, inject or continually infuse insulin through a pump, and carefully balance their insulin doses with eating and daily activities throughout the day and night. However, insulin is not a cure for diabetes, and even with intensive disease management, a significant portion of the day is still spent with either high or low blood sugar levels, placing people with T1D at risk for devastating complications such as heart attack, stroke, blindness, and  amputation.

About  JDRF
JDRF is the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. Our mission is to accelerate life-changing breakthroughs to cure, prevent and treat T1D and its complications. To accomplish this, JDRF has invested nearly $2 billion in research funding since our inception. We are an organization built on a grassroots model of people connecting in their local communities, collaborating regionally for efficiency and broader fundraising impact, and uniting on a national stage to pool resources, passion, and energy. We collaborate with academic institutions, policymakers, and corporate and industry partners to develop and deliver a pipeline of innovative therapies to people living with T1D. Our staff and volunteers throughout the United States and our six international affiliates are dedicated to advocacy, community engagement and our vision of a world without T1D. For more information, please visit jdrf.org or follow us on Twitter:  @JDRF.

All opinions expressed on USDR are those of the author and not necessarily those of US Daily Review.
Show Buttons
Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkdin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Contact us
Hide Buttons
Rimons twitter widget by Rimon Habib