How Americans Look at “Corporate Profits”

By Jeremy Morris, Associate Editor, US Daily Review.

A new ORC International survey continues to find that Americans have historically been in favor of letting Corporate America make all the profit they can.

Today two-thirds (65%) of US adults say companies should be allowed to make all the profit they can.   ORC International’s CARAVAN omnibus survey updated a question first asked in 1946 and last asked in 1976. Historically, a majority of Americans have generally been supportive of unlimited corporate profits since the question was first asked in 1946 (when 61% of Americans agreed) with the exception of 1975 and 1976 when support for unlimited corporate profit fell to 36% and 39% respectively.

The 1975 and 1976 findings stand out as an anomaly in the historical data from ORC’s archives. Speculation was that a cap on profits would help ensure the money was returned back into the economy and not put into the pockets of corporate bonuses/salaries. Historically, ORC’s polling has found low levels of support for government limits in the years following a recession when profits would be on the rise.  For instance, in 1955 support for limits was only at 28% and in polling done in other post-recession years – including 2012 – support for limits is relatively low:  1962: 25%, 1971: 33% and 2012: 30%.

To learn more about the poll and the company, visit www.ORCInternational.com.

All opinions expressed on USDR are those of the author and not necessarily those of US Daily Review.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*