How to Beat the “Sunday Night Blues”

The Working Person’s 6-step Guide to Making the Most of Each Monday – From Career Coach, Speaker and Author Ford R. Myers

By Career Potential, Special for US Daily Review

Uh oh, it’s Sunday night again! Just a few more hours of enjoyment before the dreaded event: returning to work on Monday morning.

If this is the thought that goes through your mind each Sunday night, Ford R. Myers, career coach, speaker and author of “Get The Job You Want, Even When No One’s Hiring,” (John Wiley & Sons, 2009, www.GetTheJobBook.com), can help. Myers offers the following six steps to help beat the “Sunday Night Blues” and establish a fresh approach to work each Monday.

1. Plan out your week on Sunday nights and write down your tasks. This will help break things down into smaller pieces so the work won’t seem so overwhelming.

2. Schedule at least one activity every Monday that you truly enjoy. This will give you something positive to look forward to at the beginning of your week.

3. Make Monday “Career Day.” Devote part of every Monday to career management activities, such as networking, updating your resume or researching other opportunities.

4. Assess whether you’re in the right career or job in the first place. People who truly enjoy their work generally don’t get the “Sunday Night Blues.”

5. Change your attitude. If you’ve been complaining about your job for a long time, you must take full responsibility for your situation and change it for the better.

6. Focus on long-term objectives. When you have meaningful long-range goals, you won’t focus so much on Sunday nights or Mondays – or any other day!

Myers notes, “Sunday nights are tough for many people, regardless of how happy they are in their current employment situation. No one wants to leave their family, home and personal activities to go back to work on Monday morning. However, if your professional and personal goals are not being met, or if you’re feeling underutilized, overworked or overwhelmed, chances are you’re not in the right career. And no amount of Sunday night planning can improve upon that!”

For more information and other useful tips to help those in career transition achieve career success, visit http://www.GetTheJobBook.com.

All opinions expressed on USDR are those of the author and not necessarily those of US Daily Review.

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