Seven Questions To Answer Before Launching a PR Campaign

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The Price of Business Digital Network has a new series of outstanding commentaries from thought leaders.  This is one in that series. 

Dick Grove

CEO INK Inc. Public Relations

A question most every company or organization asks themselves at some point is how to use Public Relations as a method of marketing their efforts. With my more than fifty years of experience in PR, now as the CEO of INK Inc. Public Relations and having written a book on the topic, there’s a few things that are important to know about the industry and the process to determine if a Public Relations campaign is a wise investment.  And these tips hold true for publicists looking to represent their clients successfully.

First, although my colleagues might push back on this, PR is not rocket science. It’s not curing cancer, saving the world or creating the next “big thing.” What we do is provide information, hopefully newsworthy information, to the press with the goal of helping a business or promoting a cause.

In many ways, PR today is often seen as just “getting the name” out there. What you don’t hear connected to PR as frequently as in the past are the words “News” and “Journalism.” And that’s unfortunate because “News” sits at the core of what professional publicists do.

Coverage in traditional journalistic media, whether online, hard copy or broadcast form, is all about news.  Not advertising disguised as “news.” So if news is the all-important element in securing media coverage, often described as “credible content,” how does one determine what’s newsworthy? And, from the PR perspective, how is that folded in to a pitch to interest the media?

I’ve broken it down in to seven basic questions to ask yourself, either as a leader or a publicist, to find the story that will resonate with the media and, by extension, their audience. The answers can help determine if a company or organization is newsworthy enough to grab attention from traditional press.

  1. What does the company or organization do

This should be an obvious jumping off point. What do they make, sell, create or provide in service? In other words, what’s their reason for being?

  1. How do they do it

Look for what might differentiate. Is the company or business structure unique? Is the business culture or philosophy unique? Is there anything unusual about the manufacturing, assembling or distribution methods?

  1. Is there a human-interest angle

Is there something at play that might tug at the heart? What about a “David vs. Goliath?” Media loves an underdog.

  1. Can you tie your company to breaking news or a trending story

We call this “newsjacking.” There’s no better way to become newsworthy than to tie-in to current trends or events.

  1. Is there access to data

The media loves and feeds off provable statistics. Can data be mined and refined to fit current trends, events or news cycles?

  1. If you’re not finding the news hook consider creating your own

There’s nothing like a good old-fashioned publicity stunt to get the media’s attention. Be very careful though because the stunt you create has to be founded in good journalistic reasoning and tied to the company goals. I can’t say it more clearly than No Fake News.

  1. Step back, review and dig a little deeper

I call this stage “rolling over the turkey.” It’s about looking for that forgotten morsel of meat. All the while making sure you’re targeting the correct media audience with the appropriate story. Review the previous six steps and answers and then dig even further.

If you apply these seven maxims you should be able to discover what is newsworthy. Ask what will gain the media’s attention and land stories focused on news. Real news. Not puffery, techno-speak or the repetition of unfounded rumors.

And publicists? No spinning nonsense. Your job is about the news. And it’s a good job. Do it correctly and it doesn’t require a professional organization to put initials behind your name or even a college degree. But it does require integrity, a thirst for facts and knowledge a sense of wonder about the world around you and the ability to communicate in a coherent manner. And above all else, a sense of humor.

Without the latter, I can guarantee that you won’t survive in this business.

 

Bio:

Dick Grove, author and CEO of the long-established, Kansas City-based INK Inc Public Relations, shares his thoughts about what modern day PR is, the role it can play for businesses and offers some insider tips towards creating a successful campaign. Grove, who has seen the PR industry change over his 50-year career, discusses the seven questions a business or PR pro needs to ask and answer to better their chance for success.

To learn more about Dick’s recent book, “It’s the Media, Stupid! PR Without the BS” or INK Inc. PR, visit www.inkincpr.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/PRINKincGROVE

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dickgrove/

LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW IN ITS ENTIRETY HERE:

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US Daily Review News

No articles on this site should be construed as the opinion of PriceofBusiness.com. Do your homework, get expert advice before following the advice on this or any other site.
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