Facebook Empowers Users

Editor’s Note: It seems to be a response to the looming threat of absolute shutdown. Or perhaps it is the result of user-feedback (harder to believe). Maybe it’s a competitive step, trying to portray change and freshness in the middle of a battle for dominance with sites of similar character. New sites, fresher sites, even more inventive sites, but all pretenders nonetheless. Facebook is king. The king must bear his teeth every now and then, but this is not the time for such aggression. This is the time for listening to the people, appeasing the masses. Because, after all, a different choice is but a click away.

BY SOMINA SENGUPTA

Privacy worries have bedeviled Facebook since its early days, from the introduction of the endless scroll of data known as the news feedto, most recently, the use of facial recognition technology to identify people in photographs.

At the nub of all those worries, of course, is how much people share on Facebook, with whom and — perhaps most important — how well they understand the potential consequences.

The company has struggled to find a balance between giving users too little control over privacy and giving them too much, for fear they won’t share much at all. Seeking a happy medium, Facebook announced changes on Tuesday that it says will help users get a grip on what they share.

When the changes are introduced on Thursday, every time Facebook users add a picture, comment or any other content to their profile pages, they can specify who can see it: all of their so-called Facebook friends, a specific group of friends, or everyone who has access to the Internet. These will be indicated by icons that replace the current, more complicated padlock menu.

Similar controls will apply to information like users’ phone numbers and hometowns and whether they like, say, death metal bands, on their profile pages. Users will no longer have to seek out a separate privacy page Read More

All opinions expressed on USDR are those of the author and not necessarily those of US Daily Review.

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