Defining “Criminal”

By  USDR

President Trump has decided to expand the definition of criminal as it refers to immigrants. What this means is for those people who have not filed a waiver where possible for their crimes, they may face imminent deportation, states Steven Riznyk, lead attorney at San Diego Biz Law (www.waiver-strategy.com), whose firm has been creating waivers for 29 years for both the public and lawyers  alike.

With Trump’s executive order, federal agents will have a greater net with which to catch and deport persons here illegally. Additionally, President Trump’s definition includes anyone charged with a criminal offense and conviction is not necessary. In the order, it also includes anyone who has “committed acts that constitute a chargeable criminal offense.” This takes it a step further than the no conviction required, making it easy for an officer who believes someone has disobeyed a law, even if not even charge, to deport that person. Last but not least, anyone who “in the judgment of an immigration officer” is a risk to either the public safety or national security can be removed, with little  intervention.

All opinions expressed on USDR are those of the author and not necessarily those of US Daily Review.