National Puerto Rican Coalition Urges Senators to Vote No on Cloture

By National Puerto Rican Coalition, Special for  USDR

Today, the National Puerto Rican Coalition (NPRC) released the following statement urging United States Senators to vote ‘no’ the egregious Puerto Rico Oversight, Management and Economic Stability Act (PROMESA) and oppose  cloture:

“Throughout the past two weeks, we have heard a consistent message from Senate offices:  In private, Senators overwhelmingly oppose PROMESA. However, these Senators are afraid that if they vote against this bill, they will be labeled as someone that contributed to Puerto Rico’s demise, and will be blamed for the island’s economic  crisis.

“As leaders from the Puerto Rican communities in the U.S. and on the island, we are here to tell every single U.S. Senator that if they vote against this legislation, they will be viewed instead as the champions who saved the Puerto Rican people. They will be viewed as leaders who stood up against greedy hedge fund managers and their powerful lobbyists, and protected the hard working families of Puerto  Rico.

“We know of senior Senators that are quietly working on an alternative legislation that addresses the economic crisis, while protecting the democratic values that we all  cherish.

“We strongly urge every US senator to vote their conscience and do what is right by voting ‘NO’ on the PROMESA legislation and OPPOSING  cloture.”

For more information about NPRC’s efforts and the fundamental flaws with PROMESA, visit  www.NoPROMESA.org.

In the past 32 years, the National Puerto Rican Coalition, a non-profit organization, has emerged as one of the most respected and effective organizations advocating for the concerns of the Puerto Rican community. NPRC’s mission is to systematically strengthen and enhance the social, political, and economic well-being of Puerto Ricans throughout the United States and in Puerto Rico with a special focus on the most  vulnerable.

SOURCE National Puerto Rican  Coalition

All opinions expressed on USDR are those of the author and not necessarily those of US Daily Review.