WHEN GAME-SHOW FUN BECAME HIGH-STAKES TENSION

Thank goodness for the bleepin’ bleep on those old game shows, or much of live television in those days. It doesn’t take much imagination to fill in the bleep, though – just go by the howl of the audience. Nevertheless, the bleep did keep many of those shows on the air.

But that was fun – pure fun. And it was pretty much the rule, after “The $64,000 Question” met with scandal in the 1950s. That put the high-tension, big-money games on the back burner … for a while. With the game shows from 1960 through about 1980, contestants guessed enough right words or answered enough questions correctly and took a few thousand bucks home. Or they could don a silly costume and choose between Door Number 1, 2 or 3 and make a deal. Everyone had fun along the way.

As game-show television progressed over the years, the notion of tension reentered the scene. The idea of making choices with something big on the line became a big draw again. “The Pyramid” went from “The $10,000 Pyramid” all the way up to $1 million. Then came “Who Wants to be A Millionaire?”

DEAL OR NO DEAL?


“Deal or No Deal” was a good illustration of the high-stakes philosophy of game shows. For four years, as many as 16 million viewers a night tuned in to watch a contestant open briefcases of money – one by one – with a chance at winning a cool million. It was those types of shows that had people on the edge of their seats, rather than bent over laughing. Sure, those games were fun, too. One of the fun aspects of watching a game show has always been sitting at home second-guessing contestants. We viewers enjoy saying, “you’re crazy” or “go for it” or even “hell, I can do that!”

Nowadays, with the internet age, you actually can do that – but without the pressure of cameras, studio lights and a live audience. That’s right. This Ladbrokes version of “Deal or No Deal” can be played like the T.V show on your PC, e-tablet or smartphone. All you need is internet access. If you’re not familiar with how the game works, you can figure your strategy by playing the game using the “free play” option. Then, when you’re ready for putting something on the line, there’s a wide range of betting options.

Look, if you like TV, there’ll always be “Jeopardy!” or “Wheel … of … Fortune.” But if you really want in on the action, surf over to Ladbrokes’ Deal or No Deal.

And choose wisely.

All opinions expressed on USDR are those of the author and not necessarily those of US Daily Review.

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